Our Team

 
 
Cynthia Davis-Vanloo   Cynthia Davis-Vanloo is originally from the east coast of the United States and currently resides in Seattle, WA and serves as adjunct faculty in the Early Childhood Education Department at North Seattle College. Ms. Davis-Vanloo has a diverse history of experiences that influence her teaching. Her professional background includes working with children and adults with disabilities in classroom and residential settings, early childhood education (ECE) and center management, casework and counseling with children and families, parent education, child care regulation, ECE training and coaching, and sign language interpreting. Additionally, she has completed coursework and in the final stages of the dissertation process for a doctoral degree in education (EdD). Ms. Davis-Vanloo’s EdD concentration is in Curriculum, Teaching, Learning and Leadership.  Through her professional, educational, and personal experiences Ms. Davis-Vanloo continues to develop into a  critical social justice practitioner . Her perspective is that education is a social justice issue evidenced by inequitable access and outcomes for many students. As an educator she has opportunities to help other educators think critically about how they might engage and nurture children’s love of learning, and increase equitable opportunities that meet the needs of children and families in their education environments. This is a reciprocal process that helps her think critically, and reflect on and improve her own learning and teaching.

Cynthia Davis-Vanloo

Cynthia Davis-Vanloo is originally from the east coast of the United States and currently resides in Seattle, WA and serves as adjunct faculty in the Early Childhood Education Department at North Seattle College. Ms. Davis-Vanloo has a diverse history of experiences that influence her teaching. Her professional background includes working with children and adults with disabilities in classroom and residential settings, early childhood education (ECE) and center management, casework and counseling with children and families, parent education, child care regulation, ECE training and coaching, and sign language interpreting. Additionally, she has completed coursework and in the final stages of the dissertation process for a doctoral degree in education (EdD). Ms. Davis-Vanloo’s EdD concentration is in Curriculum, Teaching, Learning and Leadership.

Through her professional, educational, and personal experiences Ms. Davis-Vanloo continues to develop into a critical social justice practitioner. Her perspective is that education is a social justice issue evidenced by inequitable access and outcomes for many students. As an educator she has opportunities to help other educators think critically about how they might engage and nurture children’s love of learning, and increase equitable opportunities that meet the needs of children and families in their education environments. This is a reciprocal process that helps her think critically, and reflect on and improve her own learning and teaching.

Cory Gann   Cory is “Papa” to grand daughter Harlow and step grandchildren Lily and Henry. While teaching adult preservice teachers, writing about literacy and serving as co-chair of Praxis are all part of his linked in profile, it’s being with kids that does the trick. Cory is professor emeritus at Central Washington University, and he taught in the early childhood program for years and years. He is one of the early members of the Culturally Relevant Anti-bias Leadership Group and he was a task force member for the first edition of  Anti-Bias Curriculum: Empowering Young Children . His book on Literacy,  Key Words: Reclaiming Children’s Precious Vocabulary  was just published May, 2018.

Cory Gann

Cory is “Papa” to grand daughter Harlow and step grandchildren Lily and Henry. While teaching adult preservice teachers, writing about literacy and serving as co-chair of Praxis are all part of his linked in profile, it’s being with kids that does the trick. Cory is professor emeritus at Central Washington University, and he taught in the early childhood program for years and years. He is one of the early members of the Culturally Relevant Anti-bias Leadership Group and he was a task force member for the first edition of Anti-Bias Curriculum: Empowering Young Children. His book on Literacy, Key Words: Reclaiming Children’s Precious Vocabulary was just published May, 2018.

Charlotte Jahn   Charlotte has worked with children and families for more than 25 years. Her work in early learning began as a teacher for toddlers in a multi-cultural program. They remain her favorite age group.  Charlotte feels privileged to have worked with very diverse groups. She provided parent education through Seattle Central Community College at a shelter for homeless women and children, at the Refugee Women’s Alliance (REWA) and at St Mark’s Capitol Hill co-operative preschool. As adjunct faculty for Pacific Oaks NW, Praxis Institute and the Seattle community college district, she has taught classes in early childhood education and human development.  Charlotte is committed to social justice issues and work that furthers our understanding of diversity. Some of her most rewarding experiences were as a board member for the Refugee Women’s Alliance (REWA) and as co-instructor for Somali child care providers. She continues to support culturally relevant and anti-bias training and resources for early childhood and school age care professionals. She is a member of the African American Child Care Task Force and was a member of the Culturally Relevant Anti –bias Leadership project. Charlotte retired from Washington State - Department of Early Learning.  She is (usually) the proud parent of two children and three grandchildren.

Charlotte Jahn

Charlotte has worked with children and families for more than 25 years. Her work in early learning began as a teacher for toddlers in a multi-cultural program. They remain her favorite age group.

Charlotte feels privileged to have worked with very diverse groups. She provided parent education through Seattle Central Community College at a shelter for homeless women and children, at the Refugee Women’s Alliance (REWA) and at St Mark’s Capitol Hill co-operative preschool. As adjunct faculty for Pacific Oaks NW, Praxis Institute and the Seattle community college district, she has taught classes in early childhood education and human development.

Charlotte is committed to social justice issues and work that furthers our understanding of diversity. Some of her most rewarding experiences were as a board member for the Refugee Women’s Alliance (REWA) and as co-instructor for Somali child care providers. She continues to support culturally relevant and anti-bias training and resources for early childhood and school age care professionals. She is a member of the African American Child Care Task Force and was a member of the Culturally Relevant Anti –bias Leadership project. Charlotte retired from Washington State - Department of Early Learning.

She is (usually) the proud parent of two children and three grandchildren.

 
Eula Scott Bynoe   Eula Scott Bynoe is a full-time Black Woman Parent Partner who along with 2 of her best friends created the first local podcast of any kind in 2016. She is also the co-host of Battle Tactics for your sexist workplaces, and yes, your workplace is sexist. Eula is a new mother to Livingston Tyree Scott Bynoe whom she birthed in her home on international day of peace. She credits her confidence to birth at home to her time as a doula and childbirth educator. Eula was born and raised in Seattle’s culture capital, the Central District, to organizers, and above all workers. She sees her role in this world as on of community builder, party starter and sister to all who can see her humanity.

Eula Scott Bynoe

Eula Scott Bynoe is a full-time Black Woman Parent Partner who along with 2 of her best friends created the first local podcast of any kind in 2016. She is also the co-host of Battle Tactics for your sexist workplaces, and yes, your workplace is sexist. Eula is a new mother to Livingston Tyree Scott Bynoe whom she birthed in her home on international day of peace. She credits her confidence to birth at home to her time as a doula and childbirth educator. Eula was born and raised in Seattle’s culture capital, the Central District, to organizers, and above all workers. She sees her role in this world as on of community builder, party starter and sister to all who can see her humanity.

Fran Davidson   I identify as white, European Canadian of Irish and English descent, and use she/her pronouns, am cis gendered. I learned racism growing up in my community and extended family - it was explicit. I didn't begin to understand the correlation between racism and unearned white privilege 'til much later. This is my work: challenging white privilege, internalized white superiority and systems of white supremacy that are the spine of this country. These individual, cultural and institutional expressions of racism are toxic to all children and must be dismantled for the healthy growth and development of all.

Fran Davidson

I identify as white, European Canadian of Irish and English descent, and use she/her pronouns, am cis gendered. I learned racism growing up in my community and extended family - it was explicit. I didn't begin to understand the correlation between racism and unearned white privilege 'til much later. This is my work: challenging white privilege, internalized white superiority and systems of white supremacy that are the spine of this country. These individual, cultural and institutional expressions of racism are toxic to all children and must be dismantled for the healthy growth and development of all.

Katrice Taylor   I am a woman of Native American, African, and Yeminis descent and the mother to three phenomenal young women. My family lineage, four generations of educators, destined me to advocate and fight for the human rights of all. Over the past 24 years my personal and professional journey as a mother, educator, consultant, director, and psychologist have propelled me to be a continual reflective practitioner and social justice advocate. I have learned the sensitive balance of nestling educational theory in with culturally and linguistically relevant practices. My journey has allowed me to gain practical knowledge in the ethical vetting of scientific and research-based interventions, scholarly articles and texts, as well as, holistically examining direct services programs through a culturally relevant lens for the community being supported. My continuing developing passion is in the redefining and destigmatization of specialized education and behavioral health services. I have found that part of my role in this life is to ensure that our most vulnerable children, those who have systemically been marginalized and oppressed, are seen in their entirety. That means our children receive access to early interventions services, relevant curriculum and instruction, assessment measurements that are culturally sensitive, and educational programming that holistically meets their needs.

Katrice Taylor

I am a woman of Native American, African, and Yeminis descent and the mother to three phenomenal young women. My family lineage, four generations of educators, destined me to advocate and fight for the human rights of all. Over the past 24 years my personal and professional journey as a mother, educator, consultant, director, and psychologist have propelled me to be a continual reflective practitioner and social justice advocate. I have learned the sensitive balance of nestling educational theory in with culturally and linguistically relevant practices. My journey has allowed me to gain practical knowledge in the ethical vetting of scientific and research-based interventions, scholarly articles and texts, as well as, holistically examining direct services programs through a culturally relevant lens for the community being supported. My continuing developing passion is in the redefining and destigmatization of specialized education and behavioral health services. I have found that part of my role in this life is to ensure that our most vulnerable children, those who have systemically been marginalized and oppressed, are seen in their entirety. That means our children receive access to early interventions services, relevant curriculum and instruction, assessment measurements that are culturally sensitive, and educational programming that holistically meets their needs.

 
 
Dominique Alex

Dominique Alex

Nnenna Odim

Nnenna Odim